Research Team

  • David F. Feldon, Ph.D. is an assistant professor of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) Education and Educational Psychology at the University of Virginia. Supported by the National Science Foundation, his research examines the development and assessment of expertise in STEM disciplines as well as the instructional mechanisms that impact skill development. His recent scholarship has been published in Educational Psychology Review, Instructional Science, the Journal of Research in Science Teaching, the Cambridge Handbook of Multimedia Learning, and the AECT Handbook of Educational Communications and Technology.
  • Briana Timmerman, Ph.D. is Associate Dean of the University of South Carolina Honors College and a Research Associate Professor in the Department of Biological Sciences. She is also currently co-PI on an NSF grant examining the development of graduate students teaching and research skills. Her research focuses on asking how undergraduates and graduate students become effective practitioners of research in a wide variety of disciplines.
  • Michelle A. Maher, Ph.D. is an associate professor of Higher Education Administration at the University of South Carolina (USC).  Her research interests include educational assessment, the development of graduate students as researchers and teachers, and the development of scholarly identity.  She has served as the Director for the Ph.D. program in Higher Education Administration at USC.  In that capacity, Dr. Maher coordinated the required class affectionately known as “dissertation boot camp” and the off campus faculty and doctoral student writing sessions called “Write On!”
  • Joanna Gilmore is a Ph.D. student in Educational Psychology at the University of South Carolina. She is a research assistant at the Office of Program Evaluation at the University of South Carolina and on an NSF grant examining the development of graduate students teaching and research skills. Her interests focus on teacher education, teacher beliefs and development, inquiry-based teaching, action research and undergraduate research, and mixed methods research. Joanna has presented at annual and international conferences such as American Educational Research Association and a special interest group of the European Association for Research on Learning and Instruction.
  • Cindy Stiegelmeyer is a Ph.D. student in Educational Psychology at the University of South Carolina. She is a Research Assistant both teaching undergraduate education courses and working on a NSF grant focusing on STEM (science, technology, engineering and mathematics) graduate students teaching and research skills. Her interests are in inquiry-based teaching and mathematics learning disabilities/dyscalculia.
  • Denise Strickland is a Research Associate in the Department of Educational Studies at the University of South Carolina. She is acting project manager of a STEP Type 2 grant focusing on improving retention in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics via a cognitive task analysis-based biology curriculum supplement. She is also part of a group investigating the effects of graduate students teaching and research activities, particularly how students research skills improve during these activities.
  • Melissa Hurst is a Ph.D. student in Educational Psychology at the University of South Carolina. She is a research assistant on an NSF grant examining the development of graduate students teaching and research skill development.  In that role, she performs both qualitative and mixed methods analyses of data collected from doctoral students and their advisors. Her dissertation research examines the interactions between STEM doctoral students’ goals, the development of their research skills, and the construction of their personal identities as researchers. Her interests focus on the three-way interaction between cognition, motivation, and learning at the higher education level.
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